Wednesday, 15 February 2017

The Old Edinburgh Club - The Population of Edinburgh: the Census online

The presentation at tonight's meeting of The Old Edinburgh Club (OEC) covered how to access Census statistics online from the period between 1851 and 2011.  The slides are available on the OEC website, and give links to the resources used.

This blog includes a few examples using Edinburgh or areas of Edinburgh to illustrate what can be retrieved.

(Slide 10) Analytical report links
 - Gaelic
- Inhabited Islands
- Household composition for population groups

(Slide 11) Understanding Scottish Places

Select the town
An example of the statistics for Edinburgh


Census also tells you about travel patterns


Slide 11 (Datashine)

Highest qualification level 4 and above (degree)


Slides 25 and 26 (Census Data Explorer - Area profiles)

Select the postcode around Augustine United Church. 




A city centre area , so not surprisingly the majority of households have no car
 





Slides 29 and 39 (Census Data Explorer - Standard Outputs)

Standard Outputs allow you to select a number of areas, and download the table to create a chart.

Select the postcode sectors covering areas in central Edinburgh, Slateford and Juniper Green.






To be continued

Population pyramid sources:

2001 and 2011 - Census Data explorer
1991 - Census Customer Services
1921, 1931 and 1951 - City of Edinburgh Council report 
1851 to 1901 - Integrated Census Microdata project

Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Teaching the Census through GIS - SAGT conference 2016 - Coatbridge

Tom Macintyre and I presented at  the Scottish Association of Geography Teachers Conference.
  
The presentation introduced a resource which contains a series of 8 lessons (including a scheme of work and downloadable resources) providing the opportunity for students to explore the 2011 Census whilst exploring a substantive problem –  that of health inequalities – and learning a range of important quantitative skills, including the use of GIS. The original resource was created by Paul Turner and Dr Adam Dennett, who were supported by an Innovative Geography Teaching Grant from the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG). This resource is being  adapted to be suitable for use with the Scottish curriculum.

The resource is still being developed and we gathered a lot of interesting views which will help in the next stage of this project.  https://censusgis.wordpress.com/


The following are the resources we shared at the event.


1) Presentation slides



2) Census Data Explorer worksheet and associated video which introduces you to downloading statistics from Scotland's Census website.

http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/documents/events_workshops/CensusDataExplorer_GLOWworkbook.pdf
 

Will be available via GLOW Module 28 - broadcast 15th November 2016


3) Scotland’s Population 2015 Infographic report

http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/files//statistics/nrs-visual/rgar-2015-infog-booklet.pdf


Sunday, 15 November 2015

Scottish Government Statistics, Census data & practical applications - SAGT conference 2015 - Perth


Tom Macintyre and I presented at  the Scottish Association of Geography Teachers Conference.

The presentation outlined a range of official statistics available from Scottish Government and the results from the 2011 Census in Scotland.  

We focused on the Scottish results published through the Census Data Explorer, and used a number of case studies to illustrate how the data can be used to answer specific questions, making links where possible to curricular frameworks for Geography and Numeracy Across Learning. 

The session ended with a discussion on potential use of Census data within Geography National Qualifications.

In the afternoon we took part in the 'Hot Spots' forum  where groups of teachers took part in 10 minute discussion on a range of resources. 

The following are the resources we shared at the event

1) Presentation slides




2) Census Data Explorer worksheet

http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/documents/events_workshops/CensusDataExplorer_practicalworksheet.pdf
 
3) Census UK Parliamentary profiles for Scotland




http://www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk/uk-parliamentary-constituency-profiles-scotland











4) Datashine Scotland  - mapping Scotland with an example for health in Ayr



http://bit.ly/1j2urCW









5) Scotland’s Population 2014 Infographic report



http://bit.ly/1H3qKsi











6) Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation training material and data






Introduction to SIMD Methodology (Notes and Slides) from
http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/SIMD/training15


Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation 2012 - Background Data http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/SIMD/DataAnalysis/Background-Data-2012

SIMD Training Materials for exercises illustrated above http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0048/00485316.pdf




Monday, 12 October 2015

Loanhead Library event - Midlothian Science Festival


A workshop was run in the Loanhead Library to help the locals to interrogate the Census website to find out key stats about the area. 

 


 

 

 

 






The workshop covered 
- use of the Census Data Explorer to get key facts for the Loanhead area
- use of DataShine Scotland to draw thematic maps 
- exploring the UK parliamentary constituency profile for Midlothian
- checking out the latest fashions in baby names!
The following are some key links used along with some illustrations of what the results looked like

 

Standard outputs

-> select the locality of Loanhead

 

 

-> Get Data will display a list of topics

-> Choose the tenure tab under the household topic and repeat for both years

2011


 

2001

 

 

-> Try DataShine Scotland to illustrate


Patterns of people aged 16 and over who are single
 

 


Patterns of social rented households


 

Overviews of constituencies are summarised using graphs



 

Baby Names

 

Finally we looked at the population NRS publication on Baby Names,with its associated visualisation.

 

 

 

The Midlothian Science Festival aims are:

  • To run enjoyable science activities in Midlothian appealing to a large, diverse audience of all ages and backgrounds, from professionals to novices, from science enthusiasts to the merely curious.
  • To provide a non-threatening entry point for local people from a varied demographic area (including rural and deprived areas) to engage with science.
  • To provide role models for careers in the form of festival staff, volunteers and presenters who work in STEM in the local area.
  • To showcase current and historical science originating within Midlothian.
  • To demonstrate Midlothian’s contribution and importance to science and technology at a global level and to broaden the horizons of future generations of scientists.

Wednesday, 7 October 2015

Cycling in the Outer Hebrides - Isle of Skye

Spent a week cycling from Barra to Lochmaddy, then from Uig in Skye to Mallaig with various journeys on the train and ferry en-route.  As ever pondered what the Census says about this area and have investigated some key demographics of the major islands on the way.




Off to Isle of Skye to battle through wind and rain






Boundary


Population change
 



The usually resident population increased by 762 from 9251 in 2001 to 10013 in 2011.

This change was not spread evenly across age groups which is illustrated in the figure above.

In 2001, 19 per cent of the population was aged 0 to 15 years old.  This decreased to 17 per cent in 2011. There were also a reduction in the percentage of the population aged 30 to 44 from 21 per cent in 2001 to 17 per cent in 2011.

In 2001, 14 per cent of the population was aged between 60 and 74 years old, with a further 9 per cent aged 75 years and over.  In 2011, these had changed to 20 percent aged between 60 and 74 and  8 per cent aged 75 year and over.

In order to understand this change, it is necessary to look at statistics on migration and mortality statistics.

Some other key census 2011 stats on Isle of Skye

There are 4456 occupied households , 841 unoccupied household spaces which are second or holiday home, and 106 unoccupied household spaces which are vacant

20 per cent of people aged 16 and over living in households are single

30 per cent of people aged 3 and over can speak Gaelic

17 per cent of people aged 3 and over speak Gaelic at home

5 per cent of people stated their religion as Roman Catholic

50 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 are employed full-time or part-time

14 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 are self-employed

Cycling in the Outer Hebrides - North Uist/Uibhist A Tuath

Spent a week cycling from Barra to Lochmaddy, then from Uig in Skye to Mallaig with various journeys on the train and ferry en-route.  As ever pondered what the Census says about this area and have investigated some key demographics of the major islands on the way.



Ended the day with a tour of North Uist/Uibhist A Tuath






Boundary


Population change
 



The usually resident population decreased by 8 from 1320 in 2001 to 1312 in 2011.

This change was not spread evenly across age groups which is illustrated in the figure above.

In 2001, 20 per cent of the population was aged 0 to 15 years old.  This decreased to 13 per cent in 2011. There were similar reductions in the percentage of the population aged 30 to 44 from 23 per cent in 2001 to 15 per cent in 2011.

In 2001, 17 per cent of the population was aged between 60 and 74 years old, with a further 8 per cent aged 75 years and over.  In 2011, these had increased to 23 percent aged between 60 and 74 and  11 per cent aged 75 year and over.

In order to understand this change, it is necessary to look at statistics on migration and mortality statistics.

Some other key census 2011 stats on Benbecula / Beinn Na Faoghla

There are 629 occupied households , 100 unoccupied household spaces which are second or holiday home, and 16 unoccupied household spaces which are vacant

28 per cent of people aged 16 and over living in households are single

62 per cent of people aged 3 and over can speak Gaelic

49 per cent of people aged 3 and over speak Gaelic at home

5 per cent of people stated their religion as Roman Catholic

53 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 are employed full-time or part-time

12 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 are self-employed

Tuesday, 22 September 2015

Cycling in the Outer Hebrides - Benbecula / Beinn Na Faoghla



Spent a week cycling from Barra to Lochmaddy, then from Uig in Skye to Mallaig with various journeys on the train and ferry en-route.  As ever pondered what the Census says about this area and have investigated some key demographics of the major islands on the way.


Over the causeway to Benbecula / Beinn Na Faoghla




Boundary 
 



Population change
   


The usually resident population increased by 81 from 1249 in 2001 to 1330 in 2011.

This change was not spread evenly across age groups which is illustrated in the figure below.

In 2001, 17 per cent of the population was aged 16 to 29 years old.  This reduced to 14 per cent in 2011.

In 2001, 12 per cent of the population was aged between 60 and 74 years old, with a further 4 per cent aged 75 years and over.  In 2011, these had increased to 15 percent aged between 60 and 74 and 5 per cent aged 75 year and over.

In order to understand this change, it is necessary to look at statistics on migration and mortality statistics.

Some other key census 2011 stats on Benbecula / Beinn Na Faoghla

There are 587 occupied households , 14 unoccupied household spaces which are second or holiday home, and 21 unoccupied household spaces which are vacant

27 per cent of people aged 16 and over living in households are single

53 per cent of people aged 3 and over can speak Gaelic

37 per cent of people aged 3 and over speak Gaelic at home

39 per cent of people stated their religion as Roman Catholic

64 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 are employed full-time or part-time

8 per cent of people aged 16 to 74 are self-employed